Review: Victory Kicks – The Decibel Age

London’s Victory Kicks created a largely impressive first EP which drew comparisons with fellow indie rockers French Kicks and The Stills. A new album has followed swiftly and stays true to their promise of “lean catchy rock music”. Interestingly, the title ‘The Decibel Age’ came from a 60’s article in The Chicago Herald decrying the increased noise levels in the city and there is a quiet confidence to this record which only rarely threatens to “rock out”.

Victory Kicks Album Cover

Carried along by chugging rhythms, ringing guitars and John Sibley’s breezy vocals, ‘Suitcase’ is an arresting opener. What the song lacks in intensity it makes up for in insistent melody and energy. That’s Victory Kicks’ charm and appeal in a nutshell really; their songs don’t blow you away but they are certainly infectious in a controlled and intelligent way. ‘Junior Code Course’ and ‘Autumn Machine’ tick the right boxes too, with strong footholds in the new wave scene.

‘The Decibel Age LP’ is a model in consistency for the most part and whilst deviations from the slick formula are encouraged, the acoustic number ‘Losing Time’ possibly loses momentum too although the twinkling, wistful ‘Replaced With Birds’ is a much more effective variation. It’s perhaps no coincidence that they sound better when the band toughen up a bit so ‘Expected A Ghost’ and ‘Mercy Rules’ both have a satisfying muscular edge, whilst Part II of the title track closes the album with another compelling hook.

Across thirty five minutes, ‘The Decibel Age’ consolidates rather than progresses the band’s oeuvre and one feels if they are to achieve the next step up, they need to develop a greater urgency and dynamism. Nevertheless, Sibley and his bandmates prove themselves to be a tight little unit who are content to make their mark with tunes rather than high volume levels.

Web Sites:
Victory Kicks Bandcamp

Further Listening:
Pilots Of Japan, French Kicks

0 Responses to “Review: Victory Kicks – The Decibel Age”



  1. Leave a Comment

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s




Categories


%d bloggers like this: